Cabinet Door Chalkboard Tutorial

Pinterest if full of posts from people using cabinet doors to make chalkboards. This post is no different but I thought I’d show you how I did mine! 

I knew that for Christmas, I wanted to be able to give out something that I had made that I knew people would like. We, coincidentally, had quite a few of these cabinet doors in the garage from the kitchen we purchased off of Craigslist a few years back.  That is where Pinterest came in handy and this project first took shape. 
I started out by filling in any holes that I knew I wouldn’t be reusing for knobs later on.  When the putty was dry, I proceeded to give the doors a good sanding and cleaning before painting. I, then, applied one coat of black paint to give some contract to the distressing process.  
After letting that first coat of black paint dry, I gave it a few coats of my primary color. This is the same color I used on our nursery dresser. You will notice in the pictures that I didn’t bother to paint over the middle of the door because that will be painted with chalkboard paint anyway.  Why waste paint if I don’t need to, right?

After two coats of the blue, I proceeded with the chalkboard paint. This was my first time using this paint so I opted to roll it on with a foam roller. I wanted the finish to be as smooth as possible and I knew a brush just wouldn’t give me the look I was going for. The roller worked perfectly.
With two coats of chalkboard paint on and dry, I started with my favorite part: distressing. I sanded the edges and tops a bit and then used glazed to really bring out the contrasting colors and textures. 
The final step was to drill some holes for the knobs and attach. Since these were Christmas presents, the knobs were picked out with each gift receiver in mind. This made a great way to customize each gift for the person receiving it. 🙂

I was really happy with how they turned out and I know that everyone that received one, really enjoyed their uniqueness as well. 

Craigslist Dresser Makeover

I love shopping Craigslist but I usually don’t buy most of the stuff that I want too. If the price isn’t too high, I tend to not want to drive all over to pick stuff up. I don’t have a truck or a trailer so most often, it takes me two trips to get things home in our SUV.  
So when I came across the two pieces below for $25 and the location happening to be 1 mile from our home, I couldn’t pass it up. I emailed the guy immediately and picked up the pieces not long after.  Both pieces for $25 bucks! Actually, the dresser for $25 and he threw the unmatching nightstand in for free. 
In the original condition, the pieces were in good shape. The dresser was 100% real wood but was missing a handle. The nightstand was half wood/ MDF and had some water damage to the top that was usually hidden by a glass top. 

Since winter was setting in fast, I opted to not do my usual 5 coat/color routine and instead, simply sanded and went straight for the primary paint.  After a good sanding to help the paint adhere, I grabbed some left over paint from our kitchen cabinets (Rustoleum Cabinet Transformation) and went to work. 

Don’t mind my messy garage.

I did three coats of this color, followed by a good amount of distressing and glaze.  Distressing has to be my most favorite part. 🙂

The hardware that I used was left over from the kitchen cabinets that I did happen to also get on  Craigslist a few years back. They looked good in their native color and condition so I just had to drill new holes in the drawers and attach them.

I was pretty happy with how they turned out. As a bonus, I was able to sell this set for $125. In the end, it was a nice little profit. 🙂

Messy Door Jamb – Update

I just realized that I got so wrapped up in our Board and Batten project that I forgot to update the Door Jamb replacement job that I did!  As stated earlier, I had to do this repair because the previous owners had used wood putty to cover an old metal plate and that plate was starting to show through. I was worried that it would cut someone coming into the house. The plate also pushed the trim out away from the wall which made it harder for me to finish the trim painting like I wanted too.

This is how the door looked with the main latch plate removed. It looks like they hand chiseled the hole larger at some point in time. To the right, you can see the plate that I was talking about earlier. Its pretty clear to see why I wanted it gone.

I started out by cutting out the entire section, door knob and deadbolt included. 
I then cut a board to fit and drilled out spots for the deadbolt and door latch plates, drilled it into place and mudded over the seams. 
The final step was to paint the patch as well as the rest of the trim. In this photo, you can see the seam pretty well. That is because I used a hammer to try and knock the latch plate into the wood a bit. I didn’t realize at the time, it would break my seam up. I have since fixed it and repainted and its no longer noticeable. 
I am really happy with the way it turned out and it looks so much better than it did before. I realize that security was compromised a bit by the patch but we also have a solid storm door that is also always locked.